Nov 21, 2014: Music

In sunshine or rain, whatever the weather....

I have recently returned from the American Orff Schulwerk Association national conference held in Music City, Nashville Tennessee. Three full days of sessions with internationally recognized teachers (not to mention the evening line dancing and contra dancing) have inspired me with a thousand new ideas and approaches to teaching creative movement and music here at TIS. Thank you one and y'all for your continued support of the music and art programs through Run for the Arts. Third Graders love their recorders!  If you haven't signed out your child's recorder, please do!

TO SIGN OUT A RECORDER, CLICK
(Ask your child:  Your child should know their ABC group, and their Recorder #)  

We read the book " The Song of Six Birds" (Deetlefs/Gilbert), in which a little girl in South Africa receives a flute from her Mama.  But there was no sign of music in it.  "I must find music for it," she says.  And off she goes on an adventure - she meets birds like the Grey Crowned Crane, the Yellow-billed Hornbill, the African Wood Owl, and others.  Each time she me met a new bird in the story, in the classroom we listened to actual field recordings of these birds she met.

To explore more bird calls and songs with your child:
Xeno-canto.org (archive of field recordings of birds from around the world)
So we decided to make our own version of the story, which we are calling "The Song of Five Birds." Using our four notes, C-A-G-E, we are learning how to recognize the notation for five bird songs and calls that are found in North America.  We tell the age old story, in which a child receives a recorder from his music teacher.  But drat the luck, there's no music in it!  So he takes a walk in the woods and meets a lovely North American bird.  After he has a musical conversation with each new bird, the class dances and sings a song set with the poem, "Birds of a Feather."   Just like birds, musicians communicate with each other by listening and responding.

Birds of a feather
flock together.
Birds of a feather
flock together.
In sunshine or rain,
whatever the weather,
Birds of a feather
flock together.
Fingerings for the bird call approximations above.  Remember, Left Hand on Top. 
- Peter Musselman
   Music Classroom blog: http://musenewstis.blogspot.com